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English & Literacy Curriculum Overview Statement

Intent

The English curriculum at all key stages is interesting, appropriate, ambitious and challenging and at the same time geared towards developing necessary skills and aptitudes as study advances through the key stages and increases in difficulty and expectation. All lessons are taught by experienced subject specialists.

Teaching and learning revolves around encouraging a sensitive and perceptive response in students to all forms of language; an appreciation and enjoyment of the written and spoken word is at the centre of this. The students’ personal responses are fostered to help develop a critical and evaluative approach to the world and our cultural environment. Independence of thought is encouraged and the students are assisted to gain confidence and clarity in oral expression both through discussion in the classroom and also through dedicated oracy tasks and opportunities. Necessarily, also correct spelling, punctuation and grammar are essential skills that need to be learned and this is achieved through the exposure to high quality content lessons both in terms of ambitious literature choices and well modelled language experiences. Moreover, the designated Literacy course in Years 7 and 8 supports. In these each class is split into two groups and in alternating lessons the boys study a reading programme with reading awards in the library whilst the other group follows a reading for meaning course explicitly geared towards acquiring and honing specific GCSE English Language skills.

Our KS3 curriculum enlivens learning. Ambitious text choices are made to engage appropriately all KS3 learners. Texts selected for each topic are equally challenging to ensure a parity of experience across all classes. From the beginning of Year 7 the programmes of study focus on engaging students through expertise and enthusiasm and teaching them skills they will need for their KS4/5 studies. This coherent approach means that the boys are prepared for progression through the increasing difficulty in levels of study and at the same time are encouraged to develop a love of the subject. Embedding and developing the key skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing are central to the delivery of this.

The KS3 English classroom through individual, pair and group work will foster the following: 

  • To stimulate lasting pupil interest and enjoyment in English.
  • To develop the habit of reading and encourage pupils to value reading for pleasure as an important skill for life.
  • To master effective reading and writing skills using challenging high quality texts and content and through a cohesive speaking, listening, reading and writing approach.
  • To enable pupils to work independently and as part of a team in varied activities, so as English contributes to the development of the core skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing.
  • To allow pupils to develop informed opinions and to be able to support them by reasonable arguments free from discriminatory attitudes or intolerance.
  • To foster and encourage a lasting enjoyment and appreciation of literature from a variety of cultures, periods and perspectives.
  • To encourage pupils to consider critically the way language is used by writers and the mass media and to develop the ability to analyse, evaluate and discriminate this use of language.
  • To recognise that students learn in different ways and so provide varied and stimulating learning situations.

Though still very much rooted in KS3 in its breadth and creativity, the course design for Year 9 has become very much focused on KS4. Year 9 is a year in which the acceleration of progress to GCSE levels of study seems very appropriate. We did not, however, want to do this simply mechanically. We wanted to do this through a more inspiring approach. Year 9 allows us the time to explore, analyse and be creative in a much freer and insightful way than is possible within the difficult time constraints of the Year 10/11 curriculum.

Implementation

 Key Stage 3

This is a coherent curriculum of consistency without uniformity in that every class follows the same curriculum but in a differing sequence and with a variety of choices of texts and resources within each topic. The curriculum is both broad and inspirational.

Students in Years 7 to 9 are assessed every half term in English. The assessments are the culmination of study for the particular text or course of study for the half term.

Year 7

KS3

ASSESSMENTS outlined are indicative only

ONE assessment per half term will be undertaken.

There are choices of types of assessment indicated as follows:

R Reading  W Writing  S&L Speaking and Listening

Autumn 1

Autobiography: Me, Myself and I

This is studied by all classes in Autumn 1 as a transition topic from junior school in order to allow the teacher to get to know the class and to socialise the students within their new classes and give them confidence in their capabilities in English, as the knowledge for this topic comes from the students themselves.

 

 

ASSESSMENT: S&L- About me!

ASSESSMENT: W- letter/diary writing

Autumn 2

Drama: Shakespeare

A Midsummer Night’s Dream; The Tempest

 

 

ASSESSMENT:

R- Comprehension extract exploring a scene, character, plot, language

W- Dramatic monologue for a chosen character

Spring 1

Language

Creative Writing English classes will also engage with the BBC 500 word competition and the Poetry by Heart competition to extend the curriculum.

 

 

ASSESSMENT:

R-  PEA/PEZZ response to a story extract exploring characterisation or setting  

W- Using a picture stimulus, write the detailed opening to a story.

Spring 2

Prose

J. Meade Faulkner, Moonfleet; Philip Pullman, Northern Lights; George Orwell, Animal Farm; H.G.Wells, War of the Worlds

 

 

ASSESSMENT:

R    A PEZZ exploration of a theme

W    Write an email to one character to another

Summer 1

Poetry

AQA (old GCSE) Poetry of Other Cultures

In class competitions for the Spelling Bee to support spelling accuracy.

 

 

ASSESSMENT:

R    A comparison of two thematically linked poems

W    A re-writing of a poem from an ‘insider’s’ point of view eg: Night of the Scorpion from the scorpion’s perspective

S&L presentation of either of the tasks above.

Summer 2

Language

The history of the English Language

Spelling Bee run by the department for Year 7.

 

 

ASSESSMENT:

An analysis of a historical written extract

W An extended homework producing a pictorial timeline of the history of English    

Year 8

KS3

 

Autumn 1

Drama

Arthur Miller, The Crucible; R.C. Sherriff, Journey’s End

 

 

ASSESSMENT:

R An extract response exploring the playwright’s use of dramatic devices

W   Writing a ‘hidden’ scene or a character study     

Autumn 2

Non-Fiction

Joe Simpson, Touching the Void; Captain Scott’s Diary

 

 

ASSESSMENT:

R     A comprehension response to Scott’s last letter    

Annotation and comparative analysis of Joe’s and Simon’s perspectives

Spring 1

Genre

The Gothic; Dystopia; Science Fiction  

English classes will also engage with the BBC 500 word competition and the Poetry by Heart competition to extend the curriculum.

 

 

ASSESSMENT:

R     An extract response, exploring the writer’s use of techniques to present genre.

W     Recreation of a genre to create a short story (500 words)            

Spring 2

Prose

Short stories

 

 

ASSESSMENT:

A comparison of a pre and post 1914 text

W A letter from one of the studied author’s explaining their intentions for the story      

Summer 1

Early Literature

Chaucer; The Canterbury Tales (middle and modern English); Homer, The Odyssey

 

 

ASSESSMENT:

A PEA/PEZZ response to how Chaucer presents a positive view of the Wife Of Bath in his Prologue   

W    A modern day Prologue and story   

Summer 2

Media

The Seven Deadly Sins of Advertising

 

 

ASSESSMENT:

A detailed discussion of a pictorial advert, exploring its presentation of explicit and implicit ideas 

W    The production of a magazine advert with detailed annotation    

 

Year 9

KS3

 

Autumn 1

Prose

 

Susan Hill, Woman in Black; William Golding, Lord of the Flies; John Steinbeck, Of Mice and Men A study of one text for a term.

 

 

ASSESSMENT:

R  Annotation of an extract to plan an essay response.

W An exploration of the presentation and development of a key character

Autumn 2

Prose

Susan Hill, Woman in Black; William Golding, Lord of the Flies; John Steinbeck, Of Mice and Men

 

 

ASSESSMENT:

R How do the settings in OMAM influence the thematic development?

W A persuasive speech by Curley’s Wife on women’s rights  

Spring 1

Drama

Shakespeare, Macbeth

 

 

R    A response to an extract of the chosen Shakespeare play investigating language, character, plot and dramatic devices.

W    An agony aunt letter (eg: from Macbeth explaining and trying to rationalise his actions)

Spring 2

Drama

Shakespeare, Macbeth

 

 

ASSESSMENT:

R  How far is Macbeth influenced by the weird sisters and Lady Macbeth?

W The obituary for Macbeth as appearing in the Cawdor Gazette using textual reference to support writing

Summer 1

AQA GCSE English Literature

Power and Conflict poetry anthology: 8 selected poems

 

 

ASSESSMENT:

S&L Presentation of a poem

R   A response to a seen and unseen thematically linked poem

Summer 2

AQQ GCSE English Language

Paper 2 Reading and writing skills.

Distribute An Inspector Calls context research summer work to be completed over the summer to build cultural capital, prior knowledge and confidence for study in Year 10.

 

 

ASSESSMENT:

Practice questions

 Key Stage 4

We use the AQA exam board. Students at GCSE level are assessed on skills and questions based on exam requirements and questions regularly throughout the courses.

At the end of Year 10 students will take the first part of the AQA English Language qualification:

  • AQA NEA English Language on Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet

At the end of Year 10 students are given exams on both courses:

  • GCSE English Literature Paper 1 Section A (Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet)
  • GCSE English Language Paper 1

In the mock examinations the Year 11 students are given exams on both courses:

  • GCSE English Literature Paper 1

(Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet and Dickens, A Christmas Carol)

  • GCSE English Language Paper 2

Year 10

English Literature and English Language AQA GCSE                                   KS4                                                   

Autumn 1

English Literature Paper 2- J.B. Priestley, An Inspector Calls- context research summer work

English Language Paper 1 – introduction

 

ASSESSMENT:

J. Priestley An Inspector Calls

Autumn 2

J. B. Priestley, An Inspector Calls

English Language Paper 1

 

ASSESSMENT:

: English Language Paper 1 Q1-4

Spring 2

English Language Paper 1

Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet Acts 2 -5

 

ASSESSMENT:

Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet

Summer 1

Complete Romeo and Juliet

Summer 2

English Language NEA on Romeo and Juliet. Revision for exams. Exam follow up/feedback

 

ASSESSMENT: : YEAR 10 EXAMS

English Language Paper 1 English Literature Paper 1 Romeo and Juliet

Distribute Dickens, A Christmas Carol for summer holiday reading

 

Year 11

English Literature and English Language AQA GCSE                                    KS4

Autumn 1

English Literature Paper 1 Dickens, A Christmas Carol Context and Introduction Staves 1-2

 

ASSESSMENT:

A Christmas Carol

Autumn 2

Complete A Christmas Carol

English Language Paper 2

 

ASSESSMENT:

Preparation for mock exams

Spring 1

Poetry Anthology- Power and Conflict – introduction

 

ASSESSMENT:

Mock exams English Language Paper 2 English Literature Paper 1

Spring 2

Complete Poetry Anthology- Power and Conflict. Begin and complete Unseen poetry

Summer 1

Revision

Key Stage 5 

We offer two separate courses A-level English Literature and A-level English Language

We challenge our KS5 students so that they are enabled to become fully rounded confident, independent, sophisticated thinkers who can interpret texts through theory and critical reading.

Students at A-level are assessed on skills and questions based on exam requirements and questions regularly throughout the courses.

Mock exams

A-level English Literature.

The exam board we use is Edexcel.

At the end of Year 12 students are given exams on:

  • Paper 1 Section B, Williams, A Streetcar Named Desire
  • Paper 2 Hardy, Tess of the D’Urbervilles and Hosseini, A Thousand Splendid Suns

In the mock examinations the Year 13 students are given exams on:

  • Paper 3 Section A, Poems of the Decade poetry
  • Paper 2 Hardy, Tess of the D’Urbervilles and Hosseini, A Thousand Splendid Suns

A-level English Language

The exam board we use is AQA

At the end of Year 12 students are given exams on:

  • Language Diversity

In the mock examinations the Year 13 students are given exams on:

  • Child Language Acquisition
  • Language Variation

KS5

English Literature

Edexcel A-level

Year 12

Teacher 1

Teacher 2

Autumn 1

Other Drama: Williams, A Streetcar Named Desire

Prose Text 2: Hardy, Tess of the D’Urbervilles

Autumn 2

Other Drama: Williams, A Streetcar Named Desire

Prose Text 2: Hardy, Tess of the D’Urbervilles

Spring 1

Prose text 1:Hosseini, A Thousand Splendid Suns

Prose Text 2: Hardy, Tess of the D’Urbervilles

Spring 2

Prose text 1:Hosseini, A Thousand Splendid Suns

Contemporary Poetry: Poems of the Decade

Summer 1

Revision for mock exams

Revision for mock exams

Summer 2

Prose connections

Contemporary Poetry: Poems of the Decade

 

KS5

English Literature

Edexcel A-Level

Year 13

Teacher 1

Teacher 2

Autumn 1

Coursework introduction

Poetry connections

Autumn 2

Coursework

Poet: Chaucer introduction

Spring 1

Shakespeare, Antony and Cleopatra

Chaucer, The Wife of Bath’s Tale

Spring 2

Shakespeare, Antony and Cleopatra / Revision

Chaucer, The Wife of Bath’s Tale / Revision

Summer 1

Revision – Timed responses

Revision – Timed responses

Summer 2

 

 

 

KS5

English Language

AQA A-Level

Year 12

Teacher 1

Teacher 2

Autumn 1

Introduction to Word Classes and Writing Skills

Introduction to Grammar and Methodology and Writing Skills

Autumn 2

Introduction to Word Classes

Introduction to Grammar and Methodology

Spring 1

Language and Power

Phonetics

Spring 2

Language and Ethnicity

Language and Gender

Summer 1

Textual Variations

Language and Occupation

Summer 2

Textual Variations

Language and Dialect

 

KS5

English Language

AQA A-Level

Year 13

Teacher 1

Teacher 2

Autumn 1

Language in Action Investigation and Coursework

Child Language Development

Autumn 2

Language in Action Investigation and Coursework

Child Language Development

Spring 1

Language in Action Investigation and Coursework

The History of English

Spring 2

Language in Action Investigation and Coursework

The History of English

Summer 1

Revision

Overlap from above and revision

 Impact

English has a unique and highly valuable place within the curriculum that impacts on wider society. For us to teach our students to research, read and listen to ideas, opinions and concepts and then use them to communicate effectively by speaking and writing coherently, fluently and accurately is central to the role of an effective English education. These skills directly benefit and impact on the future careers and lives of our students, not just for future studies in English but across all subjects and disciplines.

Our impact as a department, therefore, emerges from a holistic approach. The body of knowledge in English has many constituent parts that are inter-linked so impact and progress tend to be reflected through growing confidence and sophistication in responses to the various aspects of the subject throughout the various key stages. In the end, the skills learned in an English classroom allow a student to listen respectfully to others, read extensively to further knowledge and absorb a variety of perspectives, speak fluently and, hopefully, eloquently and write coherently, effectively and accurately. This impacts on the life chances for all the students we teach. The English department at Poole Grammar School achieves this through the following methods:

  • High quality talk is at the centre of all teaching. This impacts on students’ abilities to develop concepts and ideas and also enables to cultural capital to be accessed.
  • High quality, ambitious literature is placed at the centre of all lessons. This raises the possible impact of teaching and learning.
  • Poor literacy skills and subsequent underachievement are challenged through the Literacy programme. The impact of this is to incentivise the students to become fluent and hopefully avid readers both through classroom reading and from their own personal, pleasurable reading. From this they advance their skills in textual interpretation

.The English department ensures that all learning is challenging, well-pitched and enjoyable. We believe that all students should have a full, rounded, challenging experience of language and literature in English so that they leave the school with a perceptive awareness of what constitutes independent critical thought and an appreciation of a variety genres within literary canon through time (poetry, drama, prose, literary non-fiction and media) as well as the development of the language itself over time.