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History Curriculum Overview Statement

History

 The History curriculum at Poole Grammar School has three elements:

1) Intent: What do we learn?

2) Implementation: How do we learn it?

3) Impact: How do we know we have been successful?

Intent

History is taught as a discrete discipline throughout the school and is delivered by subject specialists.

What are you trying to achieve through your curriculum?

We are seeking to develop inquiring, independent, informed and scholarly young people who can willingly make an active contribution to society through analysis and evaluation of historical evidence.

How is the curriculum designed in your subject area?

Collaboratively but with professional judgement encouraged.

KS3 The curriculum at KS3 is undergoing a wholesale review at the moment and so its design will reflect the outcome of those discussions. The new Year 7 Course has been constructed on Britain’s place in the World to 1500 and is underway and will be followed by course on Britain and the World  1500-1990 and then Year 9 on the c.20th.

GCSE This course is designed to explain to young people their place in the World by looking at the relationship between Britain and the World over nearly two millennia through an in-depth study of migration.  It also explores the creation of our Modern World.  Furthermore, History as a discipline teaches us how to sift evidence for relevance, how to prioritise and how to evaluate opinion and argument. It is thus a key building block in critical reasoning and in human understanding. 

A-Level courses: Again these are designed by exam boards but the choice of options is determined by our wish to give students a broad understanding of the ancient and modern Worlds.

What skills/knowledge are gained at each stage?

Knowledge and Communication

Analysis (Concepts* using Cause and Consequence, Continuity and Change, Similarity and Difference, Significance)

Evaluation

Basic: Answers that identify evidence, features or material relevant to the question. 

More refined knowledge using everyday language

Begin to produce structured work

Basic understanding of key features

SPAG usually accurate

Basic: Explanation is likely to be implicit or by assertion. Identifies a cause or consequence.*

Basic chronology

More than one cause or consequence

Begins to explain cause and consequence.

Developing chronology

Basic: Answers take features of sources or interpretations at face value. Material discussed may have implicit relevance.

Infer from sources

Simple comparison

Comment on provenance

Simple: Answers that describe evidence, features or material relevant to the question. Make appropriate use of historical terminology to support and structure their work.

Simple: Answers that display simple one step reasoning or brief explanation of a point or comment that is explicitly relevant to the question.

Aware of different interpretations

Links reasons

Presents a conclusion

Simple: Answers may recognise, describe and may explain, simple similarities or differences in sources or interpretations.  Asks questions of the evidence

Comment on various aspects of provenance – tone, origin, purpose etc.

Simple Plus: Mostly accurate knowledge a  with a clear understanding of key features

SPAG mostly accurate

Simple Plus: Multiple causes and consequences*

More extended explanation.

Linking reasons to form conclusions

Simple Plus: Use of provenance to evaluate source

Understands value of evidence to particular enquiry

Developed: Relevant knowledge with clear understanding of key features

Selective,  organised and structured work

Developed: Answers that display more than one step of reasoning or detailed explanation that is explicitly relevant to the question. Sustained argument

Clear and substantiated conclusions

Developed: Answers will sustain an explanation of the differences or similarities in sources or interpretations.  Evidence of independent consideration

Testing the view with other knowledge

Full use of provenance

Developed Plus: Reasonably wide and relevant knowledge with an understanding of key features

Individual paragraphs coherent – PEEL

Developed Plus: Substantial and developed reasons

Sustained argument with greater sophistication

Debated and weighted argument

Developed Plus: Investigate some primary and secondary material with discrimination and care to reach substantiated conclusions

Complex: Comprehensive and relevant knowledge with a sophisticated understanding of key features.

Selected, organise well-structured work

Complex: Answers display reasoning that shows the links or connections between evidence or details that are explicitly relevant to the question. Answers may show originality or sophistication.

Complex: Demonstrate substantiated judgement or an awareness of the provisional and problematic nature of historical issues, evidence and interpretations.

Complex Plus: Fully comprehensive and fully relevant knowledge with sophisticated and nuanced understanding

Connected coherent paragraphs

Complex Plus: Refined and nuanced analysis which reflects complex interrelationships of cultures and events. 

Profound conclusions.

Complex Plus: Interrogate all forms of source material in a thorough and forensic manner to reach cogent, sophisticated and substantiated conclusions

What are the over-arching concepts?

We believe that we should look at equipping students with a set of skills to meet our stated aims.

Knowledge and understanding with Key concepts

Cause and consequence

Change/continuity

Similarity/difference

Significance within an historical context

Explain and analyse key concepts, arriving at substantiated judgements

Primary Source Evaluation

Understand, analyse, evaluate and make historical claims from a range of source material

Establish CRAVEN analysis as the basic vocabulary to talk about and dissect source material.

Interpretations of Secondary Sources

Analyse, evaluate and make substantiated judgements about interpretations (including how and why interpretations may differ) in the context of historical events studied.

Example: Independent Project (Yr9)

KS3 Common Assessments

 

Year 7

Mark

Year 8

Mark

Year 9

Mark

1

““Rome won its empire because of its superior army” To what extent do you agree with this view?  TDIRT

 

“Muslim armies succeeded mainly because of their military power” To what extent do you agree with this view? 632 – 732AD TDIRT

 

Jack the Ripper / Titanic– interpretations TDIRT

“The main reason why Jack the Ripper was not caught was the incompetence of the police.” How far do you agree with this view?

 

2

Write an account of the Boudiccan Revolt.  DIRTY

 

What did the Muslims do for Us? Presentation

 

Write an account of the Russian Revolutions of 1917. T

 

3

“All Destruction and Pillage” To what extent do you agree with this view of the Vikings? – interpretations exercise TDIRT

 

“The success First Crusade was due entirely to religious belief.” To what extent do you agree with this verdict?  T

 

Why did the First World War break out? TDIRT

 

Christmas

4

Hastings – former exam interpretations T

 

What was the significance of the Crusades on both Europe and the Middle East? Interpretations TDIRT

 

“Germany was to blame for the outbreak of World War One.” To what extent do you agree with this verdict?

 

5

How significant was the Norman Conquest for England? TDIRT

 

“Henry VIII was the most effective Tudor Monarch.” How far do you agree with this view? TDIRT

 

Teacher Choice on 1919-1939 (Asia to 1975) – Presentations

 

6

Kingdom of Mali

 

James VI and I – interpretations PM

 

“The Evacuation from Dunkirk in World War Two was a great disaster for Britain.” How far do the sources you have used support this interpretation of the Evacuation from Dunkirk in 1940?– interpretations TDIRT

 

Easter

7

What was the impact of the Black Death on English Society? DIRTY

 

 “The Main cause of the English Civil War was religion.” How far do you agree with this view?

 

 

“D-Day only succeeded because of the industrial power of the Allies.” How far do you agree with this interpretation? essay T

 

8

“A knight could be both a warrior and chivalrous” To what extent do you agree with this view? – interpretations T

 

Revolution in a Teacup TDIRT

 

Independent Project PM

 

9

Hundred Years War TDIRT (optional)

 

Cromwell at Drogheda – interpretations T

 

Independent Project PM

 

DIRT = Directed Improvement and Reflection Time

TDIRT = Marked by teacher then DIRT (what? So what? Now what?: 20 minutes to review and improve their work) by students followed by teacher review.

DIRTY = DIRT by students then marked by teachers

PM = Peer-marked

T = test

KS4 Common Assessments

This course is designed to explain to young people their place in the World by looking at the relationship between Britain and the World over nearly two millennia.  It also explores the creation of our Modern World.  Furthermore, History as a discipline teaches us how to sift evidence for relevance, how to prioritise and how to evaluate opinion and argument. It is thus a key building block in critical reasoning and in human understanding.  Historians are, as Khrushchev put it “dangerous because they ask questions”- no society can long survive without a clear sense of History and nor can you.

Each element of the course is covered by a series of powerpoints each including a range of Common Assessments. It is expected that each teacher will deliver at least three of each type of question within the course of any module, Each module is then ended with a GCSE-style test.

KS5 Common Assessments

Italy

Britain

Warfare – Changing Nature of Warfare – Common Assessments

Topic One: War in the Eighteenth Century

  1. War in the Eighteenth Century – Interpretations
  2. Essay: ‘All wars were ‘limited wars’.’ How far do you agree with this view of the period from 1700-1791?

Topic 2: Revolutionary Wars 1792-1800

  1. Essay Title

To what extent were changes in recruitment the main alteration in nature of warfare caused by the French Revolutionary Wars 1792-1803?

Or

How far were the French Wars of Revolution truly ‘revolutionary? 

  1. Interpretations – The French Revolutionary Wars 1792–1802

Interpretation: Role of Napoleon

Topic 3: Napoleonic Wars 1804-1815

  1. Essay Title

To what extent was the generalship of Napoleon the main factor in the success and failure of French armies 1792-1815?

“Napoleon only changed the tactics of war.” Discuss

To what extent were effective alliances the main factor in determining the outcome of war in the period from 1792 to 1855? ( adapted from Jan 2013)

Topic 4: Napoleon to Crimean War 1815-56

Essay Titles: To what extent were the views of military theorists the main influence on the changing nature of warfare 1792 to 1856?  

Topic 5: American Civil War

  1. Seminars

E3/4/5/6          Seminar Preparation “The Sinews of War”:

Each group to advocate one aspect of warfare as being the dominant force in the US Civil War

  1. Research on this and next issues
  2. Logistics, Supply and Communications
  3. Industry, State and Manpower
  4. Weaponry and Tactics

Each group must produce a seminar paper before the lesson which all will have had chance to read to comment on and annotate.

E8.       Why did the North win?

Articles from book ‘Why did the North win?’ read beforehand by pairs and then instituting a debate. Emphasis on interpretations.

Read their article – provide a short summary and then deliver the case.

E9.       Was it the First Modern War?

  1. Essays

Was the USCW the first ‘modern war’?

To what extent was relative industrial power the determining factor in the outcome of the American Civil War?

Topic 6: Wars of Unification

Essay Title: To what extent did technology influence the outcome of battles 1792 to 1945?

Topic 7: Colonial and Minor Wars

Seminar Lead Produce a short powerpoint presentation and a one-sided A4 handout to include bullet-pointed summaries.

Topic 8 The First World War

Essay

To what extent was the First World War the most important turning point in the organisation of the state for war in the period 1792-1918? (June 2015)

To what extent was the outcome of wars in the period from 1792 to 1918 mainly determined by superior resources? (Jan 2008)

Seminar F12/13: A World War?

Topic 9 The Western Front in the First World War

Essay

To what extent did superior planning and preparation determine success in war on the Western Front in world War One?

To what extent did technological change revolutionise warfare on the Western Front 1914-1918?

Seminars

F10: Did Technology Win the War on the Western Front?

Interpretations: The Western Front and the First World War 1914–1918- Debates

F3: A Necessary War?

F5: 1914: A Failure of Planning?

Evaluate the interpretations in both of the two passages and explain which you think is more convincing as an explanation of the role of the French army in 1914?

F8: Lions Led by Donkeys?

Evaluate the interpretations in both of the two passages and explain which you think is more convincing as an explanation of the effectiveness of Haig as a general?

F11: Who invented Modern Tactics in WWI?

Evaluate the interpretations in both of the two passages and explain which you think is more convincing as an explanation of the origins of tactical development on the Western Front?

Topic 11: World War Two

Essay

‘The concept of ‘total war’ should be applied only to conflicts in the twentieth century.’ How far do you agree with this view of warfare in period from 1792 to 1945? 

“Alliances had a more significant effect on the outcome of wars in the 20th century than before.” How far do you agree with this view of warfare from 1792-1945? (June 2015)

Seminar: World War Two Debates

GCSE

Is the curriculum ambitious and appropriate for all learners?

 Yes, the assessments are varied, the take-up at KS4 is very strong within an all-boys school and interest is maintained throughout, partly through frequent opportunities to learn outside the classroom.

Implementation

How is the curriculum delivered in your subject area?

The subject is taught discretely and by subject specialists using a wide variety of methods and resources that are ambitious and appropriate for all learners (see Schemes of Learning and Moodle resources.

Which topics are studied and why?

Key Stage 3 (a more extensive document – KS3 Scheme of Work – is available at https://moodle.poolegrammar.com/mod/folder/view.php?id=20541)

Year 7

Justification

Britain, Europe and the World to 1492 

To establish and understanding within young people of the multi-layered nature of British history with the context of migrations too and from Britain. Also to show comparative cultures around the world in different contexts – such as the Abbasid Empire and the Kingdom of Mali. This should provide a good basis for looking at the Modern World in Year 8.  

 

Year 8

Justification

Induction Richard III and the princes in the Tower

An in-depth source based investigation allowing students to concentrate on evaluating and judging primary evidence.

Islam – Creation of the Empire

A chance to look beyond Europe and look at the religious and cultural influence of a major empire.

Crusades – Clash of Cultures

Fusing the two previous units this take us out of Europe again but in a clash with Islam as well as focusing on primary evidence as well.

Tudors

To continue the survey of English and British history – focusing on the reformation and the nature of royal power.

Stuarts

As above but this time concentrating on the battle of political power between the Crown and Parliament to its, partial, resolution in the so-called ‘Glorious Revolution’.

Ind and Agric

Establishing the reasons for Britain’s economic dominance and consider the social consequences at home and abroad. 

 

Proposed Course for 2021-22

Year 9

In rotation

Sub-theme

Justification

A. Induction

Jack the Ripper

As at the start of Year 8 so in Year 9 an in-depth source based investigation allowing students to concentrate on evaluating and judging primary evidence

B. Origins and Course of First World War

Origins

 

Course

 

Poole in WW1 and research

To give students a chance to engage in original research within a local context, using very underused resources to present their view of the

C. The Origins of the Modern World

Russia 1905-1918

Alongside the First World War the Russian Revolution created the circumstances which made the last century.

Inter War

To give those students who will not take GCSE History a grounding in the ideologies of the c20th and give a foundation for those going on to study them further at GCSE.

World war Two

To give a grounding in the major war of the c.20th which provides a suitable starting point for GCSE studies of Germany and the Cold War.

China (option)

Widening student experience.

Holocaust

Compulsory but also vital course to explain and challenge the growth anti-Semitism.

D. Independent Project

Project of their choosing on a topic agreed with the teacher

In order to allow students to set their own tasks, gather their own resources and follow their interests. This unit tests all that we have taught them so far and allow them to explore history in its fullest sense.

 

Proposed Course for 2022-23

GCSE AQA

Paper One: Section A: Period Studies: Germany 1890-1945 Democracy and Dictatorship

This period study focuses on the development of Germany during a turbulent half century of change.  It was a period of democracy and dictatorship-the development and collapse of democracy and rise and fall of Nazism.

Paper One: Section B; Wider World Depth Studies: Conflict and tension between East and West, 1945-1972.

This wider world depth study enables students to understand the complex and diverse interests of different states and individuals and the ideologies they represented.  It focuses on the causes and events of the Cold War and seeks to show how many conflicts occurred and why it proved difficult to resolve the tensions which arose during the Cold War.  This study also considers the role of key individuals and groups and how they were affected by and influenced international relations.

Paper Two: Shaping the Nation: Section A Thematic Study: 2C Britain: Migration, empires and the people.

This thematic study will enable students to gain an understanding of how the identity of the people of Britain has been shaped by their interaction with the wider world.  It will consider the ebb and flow of peoples into and out of Britain and evaluate their motives and achievements. It considers the causes, impact and legacy of Empire upon the ruled and the ruling context of Britain’s acquisition and retreat from Empire. Students will study the importance of the following factors as they influenced Britain’s dealings with the wider world. *war *religion *government *science and technology *the role of individuals.

Paper Two: Shaping the Nation: Section B British Depth Study

Medieval England – the reign of Edward I, 1272-1307This option allows students to study in depth a specific historical period.  The depth study will focus on the major events of part of the reign of Edward considered from the economic, religious, political, social and cultural standpoint and arising controversies.

A Level History

British period study and enquiry: Britain 1930-1997

Interpretations depth study on Churchill 1930-1951 – focusing on Churchill’s role in opposition 1929-1940, his period as wartime prime minister and his international diplomacy 1939-1951.

British Period Study 1951 – 1997 – including Conservative Domination 1951-1964, Labour and Conservative 1964-1979, Thatcher and end of Consensus and Britain’s position in the World 1951-1997 

Italy 1896-1943: Non–British period study:

 Examining the social and economic background of Italian democracy 1896 to 1915 including the trasformismo governments and the foreign policy.

Then looking at Italy’s role in the First World War and the consequences of its involvement, building to the rise of Fascism to dictatorship by 1925. Finally the nature and actions of the Fascist regime at home and abroad 1925 to 1943.

Thematic study and historical interpretations: Changing Nature of Warfare 1792-1945

Examining how all aspects of warfare: direct military factors (such as soldiery and generalship), planning and preparation, economic and technological factors impact on the nature of battle and war across the period.

There are three depth topics within this: The French Wars of Revolution, the US Civil War and the Western Front on the First World War.

Topic based essay: otherwise referred as ‘Coursework’ or ‘Non-examined Assessment”

Unusually Poole Grammar School allows students, with guidance, to choose their own coursework topic and to work on it independently to allow them to pursue their own passions and work in a truly independent fashion.

A Level Ancient History

Greece

Period Study: Relations between Greek and non-Greek states 492-404BC

Concentrating upon the Persian Wars and the Peloponnesian War.

Depth Study: The Politics and Culture of Athens 460-399BC – including art and architecture, theatre, philosophy and religion.

Roman         

Period Study: The Julio-Claudian Emperors 31BC to 68AD featuring Augustus, Tiberius, Caligula (Gaius), Claudius and Nero.

Depth Study: The Breakdown of the Late Republic 88-31BC looking at why Rome descended into Civil War under Sulla, Pompey, Caesar and Octavian 

Homework

Key Stage 3 – In Key Stage 3 homework is set to give students the chance to develop and consider answers more fully or to engage in individual research. Homework is set once a cycle (every two-weeks) and should be around 60 minutes duration. It will in a range of forms: some research, some discrete questions to be answered and some project work. One piece will be an Independent Project set over a half-term in Year 9 to allow students to develop their ideas and pursue their own interests.

Key Stage 4 – At Key Stage 4 homework forms an essential part of the course allowing for revision, reflection and practice questions to be attempted to develop the skills and acquire the knowledge required for success.  Homework is set once a week but should take at least an hour to complete to a satisfactory standard.

Key Stage 5 – There is no formal distinction made between any set work and students need to learn to plan and research with increasing independence. Consequently, the tasks are both larger and are completed for greater periods of time. There is a combination of source-based analyses and essays as well as one two-term coursework piece which has to be produced independently.   

Assessment

Key Stage 3 – specific tasks will be set as Common Assessments and these will target specific core skills within the subject (as shown on the Key Stage 3 assessment grid and within the scheme of learning). This work is graded but other, more routine work may be marked but not graded as the teacher decides. There will be a minimum of one peer-assessed and one self-assessed piece of work per term.

Key Stages 4 and 5– Work is marked throughout according to the examination board guidance and mark schemes and reported to students as such. This will be the case for all homeworks, tests and internal examinations as this is the best preparation for high performance in external examinations. Mock examinations take place in January for both Year 11 and Year 13 and internal examinations in Year 10 and Year 12 both in June. We encourage self-reflection on receipt of all homework. Peer-assessment and self-assessment are both undertaken when appropriate.   

GCSE Exams

Paper One written exam: 2 hours: Understanding the Modern World 84 marks 50% of GCSE: Section A-six compulsory questions (40 marks) Section B-four compulsory questions (40 marks) SPAG (4 marks)

Paper Two written exam 2 hours: Shaping the Nation 84 marks 50% of GCSE: Section A-six compulsory questions (40 marks) Section B-four compulsory questions (40 marks) SPAG (4 marks)

A Level History

 British period study and enquiry: (unit group 1) Britain 1930-1997

Students study one of the 13 units available, each of which constitutes a substantial and coherent element of British History. The Enquiry is a source–based study which immediately precedes or follows the outline period study. British period study and enquiry (Y101-Y113)

50 marks        1 hour 30 minutes paper     25% of total A level

Non–British period study: (unit group 2) Italy 1896-1943

Students study one of the 24 units available, each of which constitutes a coherent period of non–British History. Non–British period study (Y201-Y224)

30 marks        1 hour paper                         15% of total A level

Thematic study and historical interpretations: (unit group 3) Changing Nature of Warfare 1792-1945

Students study one of the 21 units available. Each unit comprises a thematic study over a period of at least 100 years, and three in–depth studies of events, individuals or issues that are key parts of the theme. Learners will develop the ability to treat the whole period thematically, and to use their detailed knowledge of the depth study topics to evaluate interpretations of the specified key events, individuals or issues. Thematic study and historical interpretations (Y301-Y321)

80 marks        2 hour 30 minutes paper     40% of total A level

Topic based essay: (unit Y100)* **

Students will complete a 3000–4000 word essay on a topic of their choice, which may arise out of content studied elsewhere in the course. This is an internally assessed unit group. A coursework consultancy service is available.      

3000–4000 word essay (Y100/03 or 04)             

40 marks        Non exam assessment                   20% of total A level

A Level Ancient History

The assessment system will consist of two examinations (one for each of the two modules).

Period Study:         

Greece Relations between Greek and non-Greek states 492-404BC

Roman: The Julio-Claudian Emperors 31BC to 68AD

One essay (out of 30 marks) from a choice of two plus one historical interpretation question based a secondary historian’s view (out of 20 marks).   

Depth Study

Greece: The Politics and Culture of Athens 460-399BC

Rome: The Breakdown of the Late Republic 88-31BC

One essay (out of 36 marks) from a choice of two plus one source question (out of 12 marks).   

What strategies are used to deliver the curriculum?

As noted above working collaboratively but with professional judgement encourages professional conversations which allow for continuing reflection.

How coherent is the curriculum?

The curriculum has been designed to reflect the student experience throughout the school. Repetition of content is kept to a minimum to ensure breadth but the skills are re-visited on regular basis.

How do you know that the curriculum is well-delivered?

Ofsted 2015

Departmental Review Oct 2017:

All of the eight lessons observed during the review contained at least good progress, and in a number of them progress was outstanding.  This is reflected in the examination outcomes for history at GCSE and A level.

They have high expectations of their students, and this is effective in making the students strive for success.

All lessons displayed excellent subject knowledge on the part of teachers

 Ofsted 2018

Department was praised and individual lessons were selected for approval.

 Impact

Students should emerge with a clear idea of why the Modern World exists as it does but more than that they should have an interest in the past for its own sake, to glory in the differences between past and present as well as their similarities.

Students should also emerge better able to be able to discern 

Public Examination Results GCSE

Level  9          8          7          6          5          4          3          2          7/8/9

2017               45        27        26        6          2          2          1          66.1

2018   16        19        14        14        7          3          1                      65.3

2019   26        21        25        16        9          3          1          1          70.6

2020   24        22        25        20        4          1          1                      73.2

A Level History

Grade A*        A         B         C         D         E                     A*/A/B

2017   1          5          10        6          1          1                      66.6

2018   5          7          15        5          1                                  81.9

2019   0          14        12        8                                              76.5

2020   3          7          11                                                        100.0 

What impact is your curriculum having on students’ knowledge and understanding?

At the end of KS3 by students ability to engage in meaningful personal research in the independent project and in their capability of answering ‘big picture’ questions.

The above results indicate our successes at KS4 and KS5. The ongoing success of our students at university level reinforces the solidity of the foundation established within the department. 

Are there links to prior, current and future learning?

Consideration has been given to students’ experience of History at feeder schools – including the Head of Department teaching at two local primary school.

Preparation sessions for university history are also offered and attended by students with pleasing enthusiasm. Oxbridge entry sessions are also run in anticipation of the HAT examination.

Evening lectures are also a regular feature to form a bridge with university departments.

What will students have achieved by the end of each key stage?

Key Stage 3 – Students should be able to demonstrate the following skills and abilities:

Knowledge and Communication

Analysis (Concepts* using Cause and Consequence, Continuity and Change, Similarity and Difference, Significance)

Evaluation

Simple Plus: Mostly accurate knowledge a  with a clear understanding of key features

SPAG mostly accurate

Simple Plus: Multiple causes and consequences*

More extended explanation.

Linking reasons to form conclusions

Simple Plus: Use of provenance to evaluate source

Understands value of evidence to particular enquiry

Developed: Relevant knowledge with clear understanding of key features

Selective,  organised and structured work

Developed: Answers that display more than one step of reasoning or detailed explanation that is explicitly relevant to the question. Sustained argument

Clear and substantiated conclusions

Developed: Answers will sustain an explanation of the differences or similarities in sources or interpretations.  Evidence of independent consideration

Testing the view with other knowledge

Full use of provenance

Key Stage 4 – Students should be able to demonstrate the following skills and abilities:

Knowledge and Communication

Analysis (Concepts* using Cause and Consequence, Continuity and Change, Similarity and Difference, Significance)

Evaluation

Developed Plus: Reasonably wide and relevant knowledge with an understanding of key features

Individual paragraphs coherent – PEEL

Developed Plus: Substantial and developed reasons

Sustained argument with greater sophistication

Debated and weighted argument

 

Developed Plus: Investigate some primary and secondary material with discrimination and care to reach substantiated conclusions

Complex: Comprehensive and relevant knowledge with a sophisticated understanding of key features.

Selected, organise well-structured work

Complex: Answers display reasoning that shows the links or connections between evidence or details that are explicitly relevant to the question. Answers may show originality or sophistication.

Complex: Demonstrate substantiated judgement or an awareness of the provisional and problematic nature of historical issues, evidence and interpretations.

Key Stage 5 – Students should be able to demonstrate the following skills and abilities:

Knowledge and Communication

Analysis (Concepts* using Cause and Consequence, Continuity and Change, Similarity and Difference, Significance)

Evaluation

Complex Plus: Fully comprehensive and fully relevant knowledge with sophisticated and nuanced understanding

Connected coherent paragraphs

Complex Plus: Refined and nuanced analysis which reflects complex interrelationships of cultures and events. 

Profound conclusions – based on sophisticated understanding of the subject matter.

Complex Plus: Interrogate all forms of source material in a thorough and forensic manner to reach cogent, sophisticated and substantiated conclusions. The best should be able to achieve this fully independently.

How well prepared are students for the next stage in their lives?

Students often progress from the department on to a wide-range of degrees at top universities (including Oxford and Cambridge) with many opting to pursue History or related subjects.

The skills of History have always been sought after by employers as they can sift evidence, evaluate and present ideas in coherent and cogent prose.  Historians run things: 4 US presidents in the last hundred years had History degrees. Many leading writers: Melvyn Bragg, Salman Rushdie, Alan Bennett were Historians first.  Historians have left Poole Grammar School recently to join the army, law, finance, the Church, rural estate management, archaeology, politics, international recruitment and one is a tour guide at Macchu Picchu and one is a comedy writer and performer for the BBC!